Jo Cox Commission

The Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness

The Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness shone the spotlight on isolation amongst older people between March and April 2017. Whilst loneliness affects people of all ages and walks of life, older people are especially at risk as they are more likely to experience deteriorating health and the death of a loved one.

It is our responsibility to continue to raise awareness around loneliness and the ways in which we can combat it.

Marathon Runner

Marathons and Mental Health

The mental health of older people in London, and in particular loneliness, is key to Age UK London’s work. We were therefore delighted to hear that Prince William and Prince Harry are using this Sunday’s London Marathon as a vehicle to help end the stigma around talking about mental health.

Yet how does mental health vary by age group? Charlotte Cornish investigates…

Tackling Loneliness in London

As our population ages, we must ensure older people can thrive in our city. Too many older Londoners get lost in the crowd and are unable to make the most of later life. Yesterday I went to a Techy Tea Party, hosted by Age UK London at the HQ of Amazon Audible. It was part of #happytochat, a new campaign from the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness. The party reminded me of how important both personal and virtual connections can be for older people. It was great to know the older people there were being given new skills to help them […]

Table Tennis

Is Table Tennis the Future of Alzheimer’s Therapy?

With the numbers of those affected by Alzheimer’s continuing to rise (with over 1 million people in the UK expected to be affected by 2025) and the cost of treating the disease mounting (over £26 billion annually in the UK currently), now is the time for action!

Outside of the box research is key to driving advances in alternative methods of treatment and developing low cost drug free options to prevent the disease. Picking up this BATon is the BAT Foundation – a national charity investigating the benefits table tennis can have physically, mentally, and emotionally on those living with Alzheimer’s.

Ageing and Film #7 – Esio Trot

It’s always difficult to know where you stand with Roald Dahl. Whenever you pick up a book or put on a film that the great storyteller has written, it’s often hard to predict what comes next. Will it feature the heart-warming resilience of Matilda? Perhaps we’ll delve into a mysterious adventure akin to The BFG? Or maybe the bad-taste debauchery of My Uncle Oswald will surface? Whatever happens, it’s certainly very hard to second guess the mind of Mr Dahl.

Let’s see what Esio Trot has to offer…

“Barley, Bombs and Bagels” by Myrtle Russell

In 2017, at the age of 91, Myrtle Russell’s book Barley, Bombs and Bagels was published by Chaville Press. Myrtle, a client with Age UK Barnet, received computer lessons from seventeen-year-old voluntary befriender Noah, which enabled her to write the book. As a memoir of a former land girl during World War Two, Barley, Bombs and Bagels, gives a key insight into life in London during the wartime.

We’re lucky enough to have the chance to hear from three people who were involved in the production of Barley, Bombs and Bagels: Keith Martin, founder of Chaville Press; Sian Jones, Befriending Manager at Age UK Barnet; and Myrtle Russell’s daughter Sheila Gewolb, whose thoughts act as the book’s foreword.

Older Private Tenants

What Would Help Older Private Tenants?

We’re just over halfway through Age UK London’s project to raise awareness and find solutions for older private tenants in London. We’ve heard a lot from older people about the conditions they live in and their concerns for the future. This research has led us to ask a series of questions: What are the main areas of concern for older private tenants? What changes could be achievable and would help these older renters? What can be done in London, and what would need national legislation?

How to help older people

How can we Really Help Older People?

When I first came into the charity sector, I had so many questions. How do you create change in society? How do you actually help older people? How am I actually going to manage to get out of bed every morning to tackle my first 9 – 5 job?!

Thankfully the latter was easily solved simply by setting two alarms to get me out of bed in the morning and, more importantly, ensuring I had enough “desk snacks” to get me through the day.

The other two questions however, were a bit more difficult to answer…