Film Blog 3

Ageism in Film #10 – What I’ve Learned

“My four and a half years at Age UK London have indeed gone by in the blink of an eye. McCartney claims that life does too. Ethel & Ernest, and many of the other films I’ve seen this year, showed me that he’s right. We’re all ageing. I’ll be 30 in just over a month. Turning 50, 60, 70, 80 or 90 feels like a lifetime away. But it’s only the blink of an eye. After all, just yesterday George and I chatted about the fact that we still think of 1998 as being ‘only the other year’!

Working for Age UK London has, genuinely, taught me that all of us have to fight for older people. ”

Over the last year Danny Elliott has been writing a blog series called Ageism in Film. In his final article he reflects on what he’s learned about film and the age sector.

In the Hotseat #2 – Angela

Whatever the reason for the event, they are always a great opportunity to meet and speak with people in similar age groups and situations. As much as we learn from the different speakers, there’s also so much to gain from talking to people your own age and hearing all about their different experiences.

It often results in a whole lot of laughter as we put the world to rights while we enjoy each others’ company!

Glastonbury

Age Allies – Glastonbury and the Perception of Ageing

“When you think of older people what is the image that springs to mind? Where did this image come from? On what is it based? Do you judge all older people from the perspective of that image?

From what I can see now, Glastonbury has changed almost beyond recognition. But then, how would I know? The notion that any music festival can be experienced remotely on TV is absurd. It would be superficial. Judging by appearance is always unsatisfactory as it can never tell the whole story.”

With the papers suggesting the best place to watch Glastonbury is from your sofa, Richard Norman asks if he’d feel out of place at the festival at his age and looks into the ways that society’s perception of older people is often shaped by appearance.

Vidur Hotseat

In the Hotseat #1 – Vidur

Age UK London is a campaigning organisation actively striving to get the voices of older people heard. With that in mind, we thought we should interview some of the older Londoners we have worked with down the years. First up is Vidur, who tells us all about his life, offers some advice to the next generation, and reveals what he’d do to make London more age friendly.

London Transport Strategy

New London Transport Strategy: Age Friendly?

“Part of the reasoning TfL presents is an acknowledgement that having more older people in London will lead to an increased need for the transport network to be accessible, and that it must be a priority to provide a good experience for public transport passengers. Quite a few of the policy proposals in the strategy mention that they are aimed to benefit older and disabled people. TfL also argues that major new developments like Crossrail 2 are needed to prevent existing transport services from being swamped by increased passenger numbers in future. Overall, the proposals give the impression that the future transport system will have to develop and improve radically, not just proceed through gradual tweaks.”

Transport has often been a top issue that older people have raised with Age UK London. Gordon Deuchars runs the rule over the Mayor’s new Transport Strategy.

pride of place

Pride of Place with Opening Doors London

“Pride is the spine of the LGBT+ year, the one point at which all sections of the community in all their varied sexualities and identities can come together to celebrate who they are, to protest or rally against what threatens us, and to remember our losses.

It has been the spine of my life, the one fixed point of the calendar, since 1972. This is true for many older people, who have marked the years by the marches or parades they have been on, the people they have met and celebrated with – the acts and speeches indelibly etched in their minds.”

Opening Doors London’s Peter Scott-Presland teaches us all about experiencing LGBT+ Pride as an older person.

Marks out of Tenancy logo

Marks Out Of Tenancy – Aiding the Private Rental Sector

“There are various causes attributed to the growing number of older people joining the renting masses; an increase in the divorce rate, downsizing to smaller properties where paying rent might be preferential to another mortgage, or never getting onto the property ladder in the first place – whatever the reason, we think all renters deserve to have accommodation that is of decent quality and relatively stress-free.”

One in every twelve private rental tenants is an older person. Marks Out Of Tenancy is a review website to help private renters make informed choices.

grace and frankie

Ageism in Film #9 – Grace and Frankie

Grace and Robert are married to each other, as are Frankie and Sol. Robert and Sol are business partners, in a law firm in San Diego, while Grace and Frankie have never particularly gelled. They’re thrown together when Robert and Sol reveal they’re in love, have been having an affair for years, and are leaving their wives for each other.

The 39 episodes so far have looked at a whole range of issues. It’s also relevant as Pride month draws to a close to be looking at a show that is about older LGBT* people, and features a prominent LGBT* actress (Lily Tomlin).

Robert and Sol were scared of ‘going public’ with their relationship for many years. Now, some of that has to do with the fact they’re already married and didn’t want to hurt their wives more than they already had, but far too many older men and women felt forced into repressing their feelings for far too long.

As Pride Month closes, Danny Elliott runs the rule over Grace and Frankie for Age UK London’s monthly series on Ageism in Film.

fun friends and food

Fun, Friends, and Food – An Open Letter to Staff

“It feels like just yesterday I was sheepishly sitting in the doorway, waiting for my interview. Frightened for my life! I remember Sharon and everybody on the front desk welcoming me in. I smiled as I knew from then on I’d feel right at home… and now here I am 3 and half years later, ready to move on!”

We’re sad to announce that Carl Francis will be leaving Age UK London after three and a half wonderful years. Here’s a brief insight into his time with us:

Renters Legal – A new Service from Advice4Renters

Short-hold tenancies and a lack of regulation for rent price increases mean that unscrupulous proprietors may abruptly put up your rent price or serve you notice. Another concern for tenants is the unwillingness by some “landlords” to fix properties that have fallen into a state of disrepair.

Renters Legal is a social enterprise by Advice4Renters, a London charity with over thirty years experience helping disadvantaged and vulnerable tenants every day, as well as campaigning for better rights for renters. Renters Legal aims to help renters across England who are not entitled to legal aid.