red bag

The Red Bag Pathway – Improving Care Home Residents’ Visits to Hospital

“As a care home resident, it is highly likely there will be various visits and stays in hospital – in fact, a high proportion of all admissions and readmissions to hospitals are from residents in care homes. Care homes in South London have frequently expressed a need for better information sharing and communication between themselves and hospital teams during transfers of care into hospital. In many cases hospitals are unable to provide any information to care homes on residents’ care due to confidentiality and on discharge there is often a lack of information on changes to medication or care needs. Worse still, on many occasions, residents discover their belongings are often lost while in hospital.”

How can we smooth the transition from care home to hospital? Don Shenker of the Health Innovation Network South London investigates…

fruit and veg

Fruit and Veg – Too Much or Too Little?!

“How are you managing? Do you actually eat 5 portions of fruit and veg day? Well done if you do – I don’t think there are many of us who actually succeed apart from the odd occasion! 5 portions of dark chocolate a day I can manage, but fruit and veg?!”

Following the culmination of our Fit 4 Purpose programme, our online Opinion Exchange closed. This week on the blog we thought we’d highlight one of the articles posted there earlier this year, all about the proposed changes to our recommended daily allowance of fruit and veg. You can find this article and many more on our Opinion Exchange.

LGBTQ dementia care

Dementia Care in the LGBT* Community

“People who are not LGBT* struggle to understand why it might be very important at times in our lives when we are experiencing particular stresses and changes to be with people with whom there is no need to hide or explain who we are.”

This week’s blog – which appears as part of Dementia Awareness Week – sees Opening Doors London’s Sally Knocker explain how dementia care differs for members of the LGBT* community.

Frailty

Why does Frailty Matter to all of us? What can we do About it?

Frailty is not a disease itself. It is a constellation of symptoms and signs characterised by a loss of physical reserve. It can be a consequence of a combination of acute and or chronic ill health, poor mobility, weight loss and social isolation.

Frailty matters to us all. This blog will describe what frailty is, what the consequences are, and what can be done to manage it and reduce its impact.

My Living Will

Dying Matters Week – My Living Will

The second week of May is Dying Matters Awareness Week, which aims to place the importance of talking about dying, death, and bereavement firmly on the national agenda. With that in mind, we asked David Metz to tell us more about My Living Will, a new website that provides guidance and advice about the right to receive or refuse medical treatment in later life.

Marathon Runner

Marathons and Mental Health

The mental health of older people in London, and in particular loneliness, is key to Age UK London’s work. We were therefore delighted to hear that Prince William and Prince Harry are using this Sunday’s London Marathon as a vehicle to help end the stigma around talking about mental health.

Yet how does mental health vary by age group? Charlotte Cornish investigates…

Table Tennis

Is Table Tennis the Future of Alzheimer’s Therapy?

With the numbers of those affected by Alzheimer’s continuing to rise (with over 1 million people in the UK expected to be affected by 2025) and the cost of treating the disease mounting (over £26 billion annually in the UK currently), now is the time for action!

Outside of the box research is key to driving advances in alternative methods of treatment and developing low cost drug free options to prevent the disease. Picking up this BATon is the BAT Foundation – a national charity investigating the benefits table tennis can have physically, mentally, and emotionally on those living with Alzheimer’s.

National Dignity Council

National Dignity Council – Dignity Action Day

Dignity Action Day on 1st February 2017 started a month of events to promote dignity in everyday life as part an initiative by the National Dignity Council, a registered charity whose primary aim is to promote dignity across the board. The Council works actively to promote dignity in work settings and to challenge poor practice wherever they see it, by using the support of over 81,000 registered champions.

Find out all about the month’s events, including how you can get involved.

technology future's bright

Technology – The Future’s Bright… but for Whom?

I went to a breakfast briefing by Windsor Leadership Trust on the future impact of technology. The key speaker was Dr Daniel Franklin, Executive Editor of The Economist and editor of a forth-coming book, “Megatech” looking at the world in 2050.

It was fascinating stuff, including his list of ten imagined companies who are going to be integral to our lives in the future – but what are the implications for older people?

Time to Talk – Older People and Mental Health

Yesterday marked the fourth national Time to Talk Day, a yearly initiative run by Time to Change which aims to break the silence surrounding mental health issues. In fact, since it first launched in 2014, Time to Talk Day has generated millions of conversations across the country, from homes, schools, and workplaces, to online networks and the media. Such conversations are important across all demographics, but as the Mental Health Foundation’s website states, “older people are more vulnerable to mental health problems.”