Mental and Physical Healthcare

Achieving Parity between Mental and Physical Healthcare

“The conference was an opportunity to increase understanding of a range of perspectives from across the social care workforce and to develop greater knowledge of patients’ experiences when accessing both mental and physical healthcare. Attendees were also advised on the delivery of consistent messages between members of the health and social care workforce on the subject of mental and physical health needs. There was also plenty of opportunity to network – especially over lunch!”

This week, we were delighted to co-host the MaP Project Conference with Allied Health Solutions here at Tavis House. Find out all about the event here!

Mental Health and the Arts

“Age UK’s recent Wellbeing Index went so far as to say that social and civic participation and creative and cultural participation are hugely important, together making up almost 1/8th of total wellbeing in later life. Furthermore, research by the Arts Council England in 2016 found that 76% of older people said arts and culture was important in making them feel happy, while over half of those surveyed said that arts and culture helped them to meet other people as well as encouraging them to get out and about. Meanwhile, the Mental Health Foundation discovered increased confidence and self-esteem amongst participants that were engaged in forms of participatory art.”

Research suggests that arts and culture are vital to older people’s mental health and wellbeing. We investigate the research and discuss some of the barriers to participation for older people.

Marathon Runner

Marathons and Mental Health

The mental health of older people in London, and in particular loneliness, is key to Age UK London’s work. We were therefore delighted to hear that Prince William and Prince Harry are using this Sunday’s London Marathon as a vehicle to help end the stigma around talking about mental health.

Yet how does mental health vary by age group? Charlotte Cornish investigates…

Time to Talk – Older People and Mental Health

Yesterday marked the fourth national Time to Talk Day, a yearly initiative run by Time to Change which aims to break the silence surrounding mental health issues. In fact, since it first launched in 2014, Time to Talk Day has generated millions of conversations across the country, from homes, schools, and workplaces, to online networks and the media. Such conversations are important across all demographics, but as the Mental Health Foundation’s website states, “older people are more vulnerable to mental health problems.”