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Calling all over 75s in London – Claim your free TV Licence now!

Age UK London is working with TV Licensing to urge anyone aged 75 or over living in London to get in touch with TV Licensing to claim their free TV Licence. Currently, there are more than 180,000 people in London who are claiming an Over 75 TV Licence – but with nearly 460,000 Londoners aged 75 and over, lots of people are potentially paying for a Licence when they don’t need to. Here’s all the information you need to get your free TV licence sorted…

Film Blog 3

Ageism in Film #10 – What I’ve Learned

“My four and a half years at Age UK London have indeed gone by in the blink of an eye. McCartney claims that life does too. Ethel & Ernest, and many of the other films I’ve seen this year, showed me that he’s right. We’re all ageing. I’ll be 30 in just over a month. Turning 50, 60, 70, 80 or 90 feels like a lifetime away. But it’s only the blink of an eye. After all, just yesterday George and I chatted about the fact that we still think of 1998 as being ‘only the other year’!

Working for Age UK London has, genuinely, taught me that all of us have to fight for older people. ”

Over the last year Danny Elliott has been writing a blog series called Ageism in Film. In his final article he reflects on what he’s learned about film and the age sector.

Harry Brown

Ageism in Film #8 – Harry Brown

“I first watched Harry Brown seven years ago. Before viewing it again this week my memory was of some form of horrific, vigilante buddy-movie starring Michael Caine and Filch from Harry Potter. Time had clearly faded the reality of what the film was about, if not the essence; though a ‘buddy-movie’ this is not!”

In the eighth edition of our monthly series on ageing in film, Danny Elliott discusses isolation and loss of community in the vigilante thriller Harry Brown.

Ageing and Film #7 – Esio Trot

It’s always difficult to know where you stand with Roald Dahl. Whenever you pick up a book or put on a film that the great storyteller has written, it’s often hard to predict what comes next. Will it feature the heart-warming resilience of Matilda? Perhaps we’ll delve into a mysterious adventure akin to The BFG? Or maybe the bad-taste debauchery of My Uncle Oswald will surface? Whatever happens, it’s certainly very hard to second guess the mind of Mr Dahl.

Let’s see what Esio Trot has to offer…

Ageism in Film #2 – Still Alice

Welcome to the second edition of our new monthly series on ageing in film. This month Danny Elliott studies Still Alice and questions how age can affect our reaction to tragedy. You can also read last month’s article here. Age UK London works with and for the 2.2 million people aged 50+ in London. The issues faced by a 50 year old may be very different from that of an 85 year old; some of the work we do includes helping people plan for the future, alongside offering support for those re-entering employment or retraining for a new role. That ‘lower age limit’ […]

Ageism in Film #1 – The Lady in the Van

Welcome to the first edition of our new monthly series on ageism in film. This week Danny Elliott subjects The Lady in the Van to Peter Bradshaw’s Bechdel Test for Ageism. Although Peter Bradshaw points out that older women are the social group that find it hardest to come by major roles,  the first film I’m going to look at stars, and is dominated by, Dame Maggie Smith. The 81 year old played Miss Shepherd in ‘The Lady in the Van’, 16 years after she first performed the role on stage in Alan Bennett’s play of the same name. Maggie Smith is a […]